Information

6 records

Barbets are usually birds of the inner forest. They are mainly solitary birds, eating insects and fruit. Figs are the most important fruit taken by Barbets. Large fig trees will attract several species of barbet. In addition to figs numerous other species of fruiting tree and bush are visited, an individual barbet may feed on as many as 60 different species in its range. They will also visit plantations and take cultivated fruit and vegetables. Fruit is eaten whole and indigestible material such as seed pits regurgitated later. Barbets are thought to be important agents in seed dispersal in tropical forests.

Records

Brown-headed Barbet

Total Photos: 4

The brown-headed barbet is a resident breeder in the Indian subcontinent, widespread in India and also seen in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. It is an arboreal species of gardens and wooded country which eats fruit and insects. Nonetheless, it is fairly tolerant of humans and is often seen in cities, in greenery. It nests in a tree hole, laying 2-4 eggs. The bird is largely frugivorous on mangos, ripe jack, papaya, banana, figs and similar cultivated fruit trees. Its habitat includes urban and country gardens though it tends to eschew heavy forest. It nests in a suitable hole in a tree that it will often excavate out, not unlike a woodpecker. A pair will take it in turns to incubate the eggs and they often communicate with each other.

This is a relatively large barbet at 27 cm. It is a plump bird, with a short neck, large head and short tail. The adult has a streaked brown head, neck and breast, with a yellow eye patch. The rest of the plumage is green. The bill is thick and red. Sexes are similar.

Coppersmith Barbet

Total Photos: 7

The Coppersmith Barbet is brightly coloured, with a black-bordered yellow face with black eye stripes, red forecrown and throat patch. Bill stout and dark. Upper parts are grass green and underparts yellowish-green, diffusely streaked with darker green.

Juveniles are duller and lack the red patches. The sexes are alike. Somewhat larger than a sparrow, it is a relatively small barbet at 17 cm. It is a plump bird, with a short neck and large head. The short, truncated tail is distinctively triangular in flight. Keeps solitary, pairs, or small groups; larger parties occasionally on abundantly fruiting Ficus trees. Fond of sunning themselves in the morning on bare top branches of tall trees, often flitting about to sit next to each other. The flight is straight, with rapid flaps.

Golden-throated Barbet

Total Photos: 1

The Golden-throated Barbet is a resident breeder in the hills from northeast India east to southwestern China, Malaysia and Vietnam. It is a species of broadleaf evergreen forest from 900–2565 m altitude. It nests in a tree hole.

This barbet is 20.5-23.5 cm in length. It is a plump bird, with a short neck, large head and short tail. The bill is dark, and the body plumage is green, but the subspecies have different head patterns. The adult northern nominate form has a red and yellow crown, black eyestripe, white lower face neck, and yellow throat. The sexes are similar, but the juvenile is duller with a weaker head pattern.

Great Barbet

Total Photos: 2

The Great Barbet is a resident breeder in the lower-to-middle altitudes of the Himalayas, ranging across northern India, Nepal and Bhutan. It is a species of broadleaf evergreen woodlands at 600-2,565 m altitude. It nests in a tree hole. This is the largest barbet at 31-33 cm (12-13 in) in length and a weight of 192-295 g. It is a plump bird, with a short neck, large head and short tail. The adult has a blue head, large yellow bill, brown back and breast, green-streaked yellow belly and red vent. The rest of the plumage is green. Both sexes and immature birds are similar.

Malabar Barbet

Total Photos: 0

White-cheeked Barbet

Total Photos: 4

The White-cheeked Barbet is very similar to the Brown-headed Barbet, but this species is endemic to the forest areas of southern India and has distinctive supercilium and a broad white cheek stripe below the eye.

They lack the orange eye-ring of the other species which is mainly found in drier habitats although the ranges of the two species partly overlap.