Information

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The Boat-tailed Grackle is a passerine bird found as a permanent resident on the coasts of the southeastern US. It is found in coastal saltwater marshes, and, in Florida, also on inland waters. The nest is a well-concealed cup in trees or shrubs near water; three to five eggs are laid.

It is 42 cm long. Adult males have entirely iridescent black plumage, a long dark bill, a pale yellowish or brown iris and a long keel-shaped tail. The female is shorter tailed and tawny-brown in colour apart from the darker wings and tail.

Young males are black but lack the adult's iridescence. Immature females are duller versions of the adult female and have blotches or spots on the breast.

These birds forage on the ground, in shallow water, or in shrubs; they will steal food from other birds. They are omnivorous, eating insects, minnows, frogs, eggs, berries, seeds, and grain, even small birds. Boat-tailed Grackles have established significant populations in several United States Gulf Coast cities and towns where they can be found foraging in trash bins, dumpsters, and parking lots.

Photos

Boat-tailed Grackle, White Rock Creek Greenbelt
Boat-tailed Grackle, White Rock Creek Greenbelt
Boat-tailed Grackle, White Rock Creek Greenbelt
Boat-tailed Grackle, White Rock Creek Greenbelt

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