Frigatebirds

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The Frigatebirds are a family of seabirds. They are also sometimes called Man of War birds or Pirate Birds. Since they are related to the pelicans, the term Frigate Pelican is also a name applied to them.

They have long wings, tails and bills and the males have a red gular pouch that is inflated during the breeding season to attract a mate. Frigatebirds are seasonally monogamous, and nest colonially. A rough nest is constructed in low trees or on the ground on remote islands.

Frigatebirds obtain most of their food on the wing. A small amount of their diet is obtained by robbing other seabirds, a behavior that has given the family its name, and by snatching seabird chicks. 

Records

Magnificent Frigatebird

Total Photos: 3

The Magnificent Frigatebird is widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in trees in Florida, the Caribbean and Cape Verde Islands. It also breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands.

The Magnificent Frigatebird is 100 cm long with a 215 cm wingspan. Males are all black with a scarlet throat pouch which is inflated like a balloon in the breeding season. Although the feathers are black, the scapular feathers produce a purple iridescence when they reflect sunlight. Females are black, but have a white breast and lower neck sides, a brown band on the wings and a blue eye ring. Immature birds have a white head and underparts.

The Magnificent Frigatebird is silent in flight, but makes various rattling sounds at its nest. This species feeds mainly on fish, and also attacks other seabirds to force them to disgorge their meals. Frigatebirds never land on water, and always take their food items in flight.

It spends days and nights on the wing, with an average ground speed of 10 km/hour, covering 220 km before landing.