Patridges, Junglefowl

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Partridges [Perdicinae] are birds in the pheasant family. These are medium-sized birds, intermediate between the larger pheasants and the smaller quails. Partridges are native to Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Partridges are ground-nesting seed-eaters and non-migratory.

Junglefowl [Gallus] are the four living species of bird, which occur in India, Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia and Indonesia. These are large birds, with colorful male plumage, but are nevertheless difficult to see in the dense vegetation they inhabit.

Records

Banded Quail

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Barred Buttonquail

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The Barred Buttonquail is a buttonquail, one of a small family of birds which resemble, but are unrelated to, the true quails. This species is resident from India across tropical Asia to south China, Indonesia and the Philippines.

It is rufous-brown above, rusty and buff below. Chin, throat and breast closely barred with black. Female larger and more richly coloured, with throat and middle of breast black. The blue-grey bill and legs, and yellowish white eyes are diagnostic, as are also the pale buff shoulder-patches on the wings when in flight. Absence of hind toe distinguishes Bustard and Button quails from true quails. Pairs, in scrub and grassland.

Bearded Wood-Partridge

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Black Francolin

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The head of the black francolin is curved with brown iris eyes color and unique pattern of brown color crown and the throat color is black. The primary color is black with black breast rufous belly, white spots on flanks and golden brown spots at the back of body. The flight pattern of black francolin is short, direct flight punctuated by glides with rounded wings, rounded tail narrow black and white bars.

Black Guan

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Black-bellied Sandgrouse

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The black-bellied sandgrouse is a medium large bird breeds on dry open plains and similar habitats, but avoids areas completely lacking in vegetation. Its nest is a ground scrape into which three greenish eggs with cryptic markings are laid. Both sexes incubate, but only the male brings water.

The black-bellied sandgrouse is 15 in long and weighs 600 gms. The male has a grey head, neck, and breast. The underparts are black and the upperparts are golden-brown with darker markings. There is a thin black border around the lower breast, and a chestnut throat patch. The female has browner, more finely marked upperparts, including the head and the breast. The underparts and breast band are identical to the male.

Black-breasted Wood-Quail

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Black-eared Wood-Quail

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Black-throated Bobwhite

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Blood Pheasant

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Blood pheasants have the size of a small fowl, about 17 in in length with a short convex, very strong black bill, feathered between bill and eye, and a small crest of various coloured feathers. The color of the plumage above is dark ash, with white shafts, the coverts of the wings various tinged with green, with broad strokes of white through the length of each feather, the feathers of the chin deep crimson; on the breast, belly and sides feathers are lance-shaped, of various length, the tips green with crimson margins, collectively resembling dashes of blood scattered on the breast and belly. The tail consists of twelve sub-equal feathers, shafts white, rounded, the ends whitish, the coverts a rich crimson red.

Blyth's Tragopan

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Blyth’s tragopan pheasant is the largest Tragopan. Like most pheasants, the male is brightly colored. It is recognized by its rusty red head, yellow facial skin, and that it is spotted with small white dots on its back called ocelli. A black band extends from the base of the bill to the crown coupled with another black band extending behind the eyes. Like the rest of the tragopans, males have two pale blue horns that become erect during matting. Its lappet, a decorated flap, hangs from the throat and is brightly colored. This lappet can be expanded and exposed during mating season as well. Females are not as brightly colored as the male tragopan, for they do not need the extravagant appearance to attract a male counterpart. Overall, they are dark brown with a mixture of black, buff and white mottling. Their simple and dull look is a protection mechanism from other animals, known as camouflage. It also allows the females to protect their young that are in the early stages of life.

Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse

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The chestnut-bellied sandgrouse are found in sparse, bushy, arid land which is common in central and northern Africa, and southern Asia. Though they live in hot, arid climates, they are highly reliant on water. They have been known to travel up to 50 miles in one day in search of water.

Chukar Partridge

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It has a light brown back, grey breast, and buff belly. The shades vary across the various populations. The face is white with a black gorget. It has rufous-streaked flanks, red legs and coral red bill. Sexes are similar, the female slightly smaller in size and lacking the spur. The tail has 14 feathers, the third primary is the longest while the first is level with the fifth and sixth primaries.

This partridge has its native range in Asia, including Israel, Lebanon, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, along the inner ranges of the Western Himalayas to Nepal. The habitat in the native range is rocky open hillsides with grass or scattered scrub or cultivation. They are not found in areas of high humidity or rainfall.

Chukar will take a wide variety of seeds and some insects as food. It also ingests grit. Chukar roost on rocky slopes or under shrubs. A group may roost in a tight circle with their heads pointed outwards to conserve heat and keep a look out for predators.

Crested Bobwhite

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Crested Guan

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Dusky Grouse

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Elegant Quail

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Erckel's Francolin

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Gambel's Quail

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Gray Partridge

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Gray-headed Chachalaca

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Great Curassow

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Greater Prairie-Chicken

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Greater Sage-Grouse

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Grey Francolin

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The Grey Francolin is a species found in the plains and drier parts of South Asia. They are found in open cultivated lands as well as scrub forest. During the breeding season calling males attract challengers and decoys were used to trap these birds especially for fighting.

It is a medium sized francolin with males averaging 35 cm and females 30 cm. The males weigh 350 g whereas the weight of the females is 300 g. The francolin is barred throughout and the face is pale with a thin black border to the pale throat.

Grey Junglefowl

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The Grey junglefowl, also known as Sonnerat's junglefowl, is one of the wild ancestors of domestic fowl together with the red junglefowl and other junglefowls. The Grey junglefowl is responsible for the yellow pigment in the legs and different body parts of all the domesticated chicken.

This species is endemic to India, and even today it is found mainly in peninsular India and towards the northern boundary. It sometimes hybridize in the wild with red junglefowl. They also hybridize readily in captivity and sometimes with free-range domestic fowl kept in habitations close to forests.

The male has a black cape with ochre spots and the body plumage on a grey ground colour is finely patterned. The elongated neck feathers are dark and end in a small, hard, yellowish plate. The male has red wattles and combs but not as strongly developed as in the red junglefowl. Legs of males are red and have spurs while the yellow legs of females usually lack spurs. The central tail feathers are long and sickle shaped. Males have an eclipse plumage in which they moult their colourful neck feathers in summer during or after the breeding season. The female is duller and has black and white streaking on the underparts and yellow legs.

Gunnison Sage-Grouse

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Helmeted Guineafowl

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The Helmeted Guineafowl breeds in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara, and has been widely introduced into the West Indies, Brazil, Australia and southern France.

The Helmeted Guineafowl is a large 60 cm bird with a round body and small head. They weigh about 1.5 kg. The body plumage is gray-black spangled with white. Like other guineafowl, this species has an unfeathered head, in this case decorated with a dull yellow or reddish bony knob, and red and blue patches of skin. The wings are short and rounded, and the tail is also short. Various sub-species are proposed, differences in appearance being mostly a large variation in shape, size and colour of the casque and facial wattles.

Highland Guan

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Himalayan Monal

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Himalayan monal is a relatively large-sized pheasant. The adult male has multicoloured plumage throughout, while the female, as in other pheasants, is dull in colour. Notable features in the male include a long, metallic green crest, coppery feathers on the back and neck, and a prominent white rump that is most visible when the bird is in flight. The tail feathers of the male are uniformly rufous, becoming darker towards the tips, whereas the lower tail coverts of females are white, barred with black and red. The female has a prominent white patch on the throat and a white strip on the tail. The first-year male and the juvenile resemble the female, but the first-year male is larger and the juvenile is less distinctly marked.

Horned Guan

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Indian Peafowl

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The Indian Peafowl is a resident breeder in the Indian subcontinent and has been introduced into many parts of the world and feral populations exist in many introduced regions. The peacock is the national bird of India and is the largest Asian galliform. The species is found in dry semi-desert grasslands, scrub and deciduous forests. It forages and nests on the ground but roosts on top of trees. It eats seeds, insects, fruits, small mammals and reptiles. Females are about 86 cm long and weigh 5 kg, while males average at about 8 ft in full breeding plumage and weigh 6 kg.

The male is called a Peacock, the female a Peahen. The Indian Peacock has iridescent blue-green plumage. The upper tail coverts on its back are elongated and ornate with an eye at the end of each feather. These are the Peacocks display feathers. The female plumage is a mixture of dull green, grey and iridescent blue, with the greenish-grey predominating. In the breeding season, females stand apart by lacking the long tail feathers also known as train, and in the non-breeding season they can be distinguished from males by the green colour of the neck as opposed to the blue on the males.

Jungle Bush Quail

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The Jungle Bush Quail is a species of quail found in India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Very different from the female, the male Jungle Bush Quail has a white moustache, heavily barred white underparts, and variegated wings. The female has a uniform, rich chestnut breast and belly. However, both the male and the female have red and white streaks on the head.The diet of the Jungle Bush Quail consists mainly of seeds. particularly of grasses, although it also takes insects. Breeding takes place after the rains and lasts until the onset of colder weather, with the precise period varying across the range; five or six eggs are produced and incubation takes between 16 and 18 days.

Kalij Pheasant

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Lesser Prairie-Chicken

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Long-tailed Wood-Partridge

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Marbled Wood-Quail

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Montezuma Quail

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Mountain Quail

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Mrs. Hume's Pheasant

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Mrs. Hume's pheasant is a large forest pheasant with a greyish brown head, bare red facial skin, chestnut brown plumage, yellowish bill, brownish orange iris, white wingbars and metallic blue neck feathers. The male has a long greyish white, barred black and brown tail. The female is a chestnut brown bird with whitish throat, buff color belly and white-tipped tail.

Northern Bobwhite

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Ocellated Quail

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Ocellated Turkey

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Painted Francolin

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This species is endemic to the Indian Subcontinent. It is distributed patchily from Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh south into peninsular India (but not along the Malabar coast and rare south of Coimbatore) and in Sri Lanka. The species interbreeds with the black francolin along its northern and appears similar to the female of that species but has no rufous hindcollar, instead having a bright rufous face and throat. The underside has white spots while the legs are orange-yellow to red. It is more arboreal in its habits than the black francolin. The legs of both sexes have no spurs.

Painted Sandgrouse

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Plain Chachalaca

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Rain Quail

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The rain quail is found in the Indian Subcontinent. It lacks barring on primaries. The male has a black breast-patch and distinctive head pattern of black and white. The female is difficult to separate from female common quail, although the spots on the breast are more delicate. It is 6.5 in in length and weighs 70 g.

It's distribution is Grassland, cropped fields, and scrubs in the Indus valley of central Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan, ranging across the Gangetic plains, and parts of peninsular continental India. Mostly seen in winter further south.

Red Junglefowl

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The Red Junglefowl is a tropical member of the Pheasant family. The Red Junglefowl was first raised in captivity at least several thousand years ago in Asia, and the domesticated form has been used all around the world as a very productive food source for both meat and eggs. Some breeds have been specifically developed to produce these.

Red Spurfowl

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The red spurfowl is a member of the pheasant family and is endemic to India. It is a bird of forests, and is quite secretive despite its size. It has a distinctive call and is often hard to see except for a few seconds when it flushes from the undergrowth. It appears reddish and like a long-tailed partridge. The bare skin around the eye is reddish. The legs of both males and females have one or two spurs, which give them their name.

Overall reddish-brown, this large partridge-like bird has a somewhat long tail. The upper parts are brown with dark barring while the face and neck are more grey in the male. The underside is rufous with dark markings and both sexes have a red facial skin patch and red legs with one or two spurs. Both sexes have long feathers on the crown that can be erected into a crest.

Rock Bush Quail

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The rock bush quail is found in parts of peninsular India. They are found in small coveys and are often detected only suddenly, when they burst out into flight en masse from under vegetation. It is 7.25 in in length and weighs 85 g.

Rock Ptarmigan

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Rufous-bellied Chachalaca

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Rufous-vented Chachalaca

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Scaled Quail

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Sharp-tailed Grouse

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Singing Quail

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Sooty Grouse

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Spotted Wood-Quail

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Spruce Grouse

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Tacarcuna Wood-Quail

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Tawny-faced Quail

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Vulturine Guineafowl

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The Vulturine Guineafowl is the largest extant guineafowl species. It is a resident breeder in northeast Africa, from southern Ethiopia through Kenya and just into northern Tanzania.

Vulturine Guineafowl is a large bird with a round body and small head. It is longer in the wings, neck, legs and tail than other guineafowl. The adult has a bare blue face and black neck, and although all other guineafowl have unfeathered heads, this species looks particularly like a vulture because of the long bare neck and head.

The slim neck projects from a cape of long, glossy, blue and white hackles. The breast is cobalt blue, and the rest of the body plumage is black, finely spangled with white. The wings are short and rounded, and the tail is longer than others in the family Numididae.

The sexes are similar, although the female is usually slightly smaller than the male and with smaller tarsal spurs. Young birds are mainly grey-brown, with a duller blue breast and short hackles.

Watercock

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West Mexican Chachalaca

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Western Tragopan

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The western tragopan is a medium-sized brightly plumaged pheasant found along the Himalayas from Hazara in northern Pakistan in the west to Uttarakhand within India to the east. The species is highly endangered and globally threatened. The male is very dark, grey and black with numerous white spots, each spot bordered with black and deep crimson patches on the sides and back of the neck. The throat is bare with blue skin while the bare facial skin is red. They have a small black occipital crest. Females have pale brownish-grey upper parts finely vermiculated and spotted with black, and most of the feathers have black patches and central white streaks. Immature males resemble females, but are larger in size with longer legs and variable amount of black on head and red on neck.

White-bellied Chachalaca

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White-tailed Ptarmigan

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Wild Turkey

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